Medium: I’m voluntarily limiting big corporate money in my campaign.

And I’m fighting to make sure the voices of grassroots Oregonians are not silenced.

Oregon is one of only five states in the nation that allows unlimited contributions to political campaigns from corporations.

While we have thorough reporting of campaign contributions, we still have a “Wild West approach” to the amount and the kinds of money we allow to influence our politics.

I think it’s time to change that.

That’s why I strongly supported SJR 18 — The Oregon Campaign Finance Limits Amendment — that will be on next November’s ballot. And why I’m so proud that under my leadership, the Oregon House voted to pass HB 2714 which would have put campaign contributions limits in place had the Senate taken the issue up.

I’ve experienced what happens when you take on the petroleum industry for ripping consumers off at the pump.

I saw the army of lobbyists show up in Salem from the telecom industry when I authored and passed one of the nation’s first net neutrality laws to keep the internet free and open.

I’ve watched the timber, oil and gas industries stir up fear and even help incite violence to stop the legislature from taking decisive action on climate change.

I know what happens when you sponsor and pass a bill to require a background check to purchase a gun, going against the gun manufacturers and the NRA.

One thing has become crystal clear to me during my time in the state legislature:

When big corporations are able to spend an unlimited amount of money influencing our government and our politics, regular people suffer and good public policy is harmed.

That’s why I’m hoping Oregonians will vote YES next year for the campaign finance limits ballot measure and authorize our state legislators and local governments to debate how we should limit campaign contributions and expenditures going forward.

Oregon voters need to address the impact that big corporate money has on our politics and how it affects the ballot initiative process in our state.

But until the Legislature can fully address this issue, there’s an opportunity for me to set the standards in my own campaign and help lead the way.

That’s why I’ve decided that I will voluntarily place limits on corporate contributions to my campaign for Secretary of State — similar to those in place in Washington state.

I’m placing a $2000 limit per election on contributions from for-profit corporations to my campaign.

And my campaign will not accept contributions from any for-profit corporation that does not do business in the state of Oregon.

But I firmly believe that while we limit the influence of big corporations in Oregon campaigns, we need to protect and amplify the voices of working people in our electoral process.

It’s critical that we safeguard the rights of Oregonians who care about important issues to band together and pool their voluntary individual contributions so they can exercise their power through political action committees.

By joining together through PACS, small donors in organizations that care about our environment, advocate for LGBTQ rights and fight for reproductive health care can have a BIG impact on electing committed progressive leaders.

And so can individual union workers who decide to donate just a few cents from each hour’s pay to lift up their collective voices to fight for their rights and a fair shot for their families.

I’m running for Secretary of State to fight for fairness.

That starts by turning down the volume on big corporations while raising up the voices of thousands of concerned, committed Oregonians.

Source: https://medium.com/@williamson.jennifer/jenniferwilliamsoncontributionlimits-496fb02aaf05

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